This week, as the southern United States is bombarded by some of the most intense storms in the country’s history, business leaders, researchers, artists and NGOs gather in New York City for Climate Week 2017. Throughout the week, attendees are invited to participate in panel discussions, exhibitions, seminars and concerts, all designed to drive awareness and debate, and keep climate action at the top of the global agenda. Organized every year by The Climate Group, Climate Week NYC is one of the most influential summits in the sphere of global climate action.

As one of the nation’s leading research universities committed to tackling the global problems of climate change from scientific, technological and public policy angles, Carnegie Mellon University is proud to support Climate Week NYC and other events like it that help to elevate climate science and increase awareness of the need to act. In a time when the public conversation surrounding climate research is clouded by misinformation, events like these encourage people from all spheres of influence to engage with factual, scientific inquiry.

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Learn more about Climate Week NYC.

In the department of Engineering and Public Policy, we see it as our mission to promote fact-based civil discourse and engagement around the climate issues that impact us all. Through rigorous research in the areas of infrastructure adaptation and energy policy, and community outreach events designed to foster an informed public, we believe that meaningful climate action can only be undertaken when accurate scientific information is put into the hands of as many people as possible, no matter their level of expertise. We offer interdisciplinary courses specifically designed to introduce to our students the science of climate change and its implications for policy, mirroring the multi-disciplinary ethos of Climate Week NYC−an ethos we at Carnegie Mellon see as the heart and soul of our research.

Signatories:

Doug Sicker – Department Head, Department of Engineering and Public Policy

M. Granger Morgan – Hamerschlag University Professor of Engineering, Department of Engineering and Public Policy

Jay Apt – Professor, Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Tepper School of Business

Inês Azevedo – Professor, Department of Engineering and Public Policy

Kate S. Whitefoot – Assistant Professor, Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Jon Peha – Professor, Department of Engineering and Public Policy