Faculty

Keith Cook is a professor in the Biomedical Engineering Department of Carnegie Mellon University. Cook’s research applies biomedical engineering to cardiac and pulmonary diseases. His laboratory’s goal, therefore, is to generate new devices, treatment strategies, and diagnostic tools and translate them to the clinic.

Current research projects in his group include thoracic artificial lungs, perfluorocarbon emulsions for pulmonary drug delivery, new biomaterial approaches for reducing coagulation at artificial surfaces, and PET-based diagnostic tools for right ventricular dysfunction. Of note, his laboratory was the first to produce 24 hour, week, and 30-day in vivo studies of thoracic artificial lungs, and his group is working on a artificial lung intended as destination therapy for years of respiratory support. Professor Cook currently serves as an editor of the American Society of Artificial Internal Organs Journal.

Office
4N07 Scott Hall
Phone
412.268.7383
Email
keicook@andrew.cmu.edu
Google Scholar
Keith Cook
Websites
Cook Cardiopulmonary Engineering Group website

Destination Therapy: Artificial Lungs

Engineering Artificial Lungs

Education

2000 Ph.D., Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University

1996 MS, Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University

1993 BSE, Engineering Science, University of Michigan

1993 BSE, Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan

Media mentions


VentureBeat

Cook featured about “RoboVentilator”

BME’s Keith Cook was featured in VentureBeat on work to create a low-cost, modular ventilator. Lead by SCS’s Howie Choset, the “RoboVentilator” will help meet the high demand for ventilators exposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, in preparation for possible future respiratory disease outbreaks.

the Bioengineered Organs Initiative

Researchers donate equipment to Allegheny County Health Department

Personal protective equipment generally used in laboratories will aid front-line responders fighting COVID-19.

the Bioengineered Organs Initiative

Scott and Ng win cardiovascular award

BME Ph.D. students Jacqueline Scott and Wai Hoe Ng won awards for presenting research at AHA’s 28th Annual Fellows Research Day.

Ph.D. students win cardiovascular award

BME Ph.D. students Jacqueline Scott and Wai Hoe Ng won awards for presenting research at AHA’s 28th Annual Fellows Research Day on January 17. Scott won first in clinical, and Ng won second in basic.

CMU Engineering

Creating lungs “from scratch”

There are many ways to make a lung. With so many possible approaches, where do you even start? BME Ph.D. student Erica Comber has the answer.

CMU News

BME undergraduate student receives Fulbright

BME undergraduate student Erin Kavanagh has received a 2019 Fulbright Award. At Carnegie Mellon, she has been involved with research in BME’s Keith Cook’s lab, which is working to develop artificial lung devices. Through the Fulbright Award program, Kavanagh will be continuing her artificial lung research in Germany.

the Bioengineered Organs Initiative

Cook inducted into AIMBE

Biomedical Engineering Professor Keith Cook has been inducted into College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE).

CMU Engineering

...in with the good

With a grant from the U.S. Army, Biomedical Engineering professor Keith Cook is revolutionizing the field of external oxygenators.

CMU Engineering

A breath of fresh perfluorocarbon

Many chronic lung diseases limit the ability of inhaled medications to reach the areas they need to reach. BME’s Diane Nelson has been working on a solution: liquid perfluorocarbon emulsions.

the Bioengineered Organs Initiative

Cook discusses artificial lung technology on SciTechNow

In an interview with SciTechNow, Biomedical Engineering Professor Keith Cook discussed advances in artificial lung use and technology.

New Scientist

Cook featured in New Scientist for artificial lung research

BME’s Keith Cook was featured in a New Scientist article on the development of artificial lungs.

CMU Engineering

Dowd Seed Fund for Fellowships

Some of the greatest innovations of our time started out with the riskiest ideas. But risky ideas often go unfunded—until someone is brave enough to trust in the researcher's dreams.