People

Prior to joining Carnegie Mellon in 2012, Professor Elizabeth Holm spent 20 years as a computational materials scientist at Sandia National Laboratories working on simulations to improve processes for lighting manufacture, microcircuit aging and reliability, and the processing and welding of advanced materials. Holm obtained her B.S.E. in materials science and engineering from the University of Michigan, S.M. in ceramics from MIT, and dual Ph.D. degrees in materials science and engineering, and scientific computing from the University of Michigan. Active in professional societies, Holm has received several honors and awards, is a Fellow of ASM International, the 2013 president of The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, an organizer of several international conferences, and has been a member of the National Materials Advisory Board. Holm has authored or co-authored over 110 publications.

Office
3315 Wean Hall
Phone
412.268.1762
Email
eaholm@andrew.cmu.edu
Google Scholar
Elizabeth Holm

The Computer Vision Approach to 3-D Printing

Automatically Evaluating Microstructures

Behind the Researcher: Materials in the Moment

Education

1992 Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering and Scientific Computing, University of Michigan

1989 SM, Ceramics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1987 BSE, Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Michigan

Media mentions


The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society

Holm receives service award from TMS

MSE’s Elizabeth Holm received the 2020 Alexander Scott Distinguished Service Award from The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society.

CMU Engineering

Air Force partnership to fuse AI and materials research

CMU and Air Force Research Laboratory establish 5-year, $7.5M Center of Excellence in data-driven materials research.

CMU Engineering

Taking a closer look at steel using computer vision

CMU engineers are applying computer vision and machine learning to improve the study of inclusions, microscopic particle within steel that can have a big impact on metal properties.

CMU Engineering

Six things you should know about AI from experts in the field

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University’s College of Engineering share what they have learned about artificial intelligence while working in the field.

Next Manufacturing

3D Printing Media Network covers NASA funding in Next Manufacturing Center

3D Printing Media Network covered the recent news that CMU has been selected by NASA to lead a research team dedicated to examining new ways to build and power aircraft of the future, through NASA’s University Leadership Initiative.

CMU Engineering

NASA invests in 3D printing for aviation

CMU has been selected by NASA to lead a research team dedicated to examining new ways to build and power aircraft of the future, through NASA’s University Leadership Initiative.

Information Week

Holm addresses people's concerns about AI algorithms

People do not understand how AI algorithms work and consider them as "black boxes." Responding to this concern, MSE's Elizabeth Holm concluded that AI black boxes are not all bad because human thought processes are unexplainable to begin with.

The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society

Holm named 2019 TMS Fellow

MSE’s Liz Holm was recently named a 2019 Fellow of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS).

Reuters

Top companies "hungry" for job applicants skilled in AI

The need for engineers adept at AI has never been higher. As MSE professor Liz Holm has pointed out in a recent Reuters article, “companies are really hungry for these folks,” with many driving up wages in hopes of attracting talented employees.

CMU Engineering

The next generation of materials

A summer research fellowship sponsored by Citrine Informatics gave students the chance to use cutting-edge computer vision technologies to solve questions in materials science research.

CIO

Holm quoted on how companies can use AI and machine learning to boost speed

MSE’s Elizabeth Holm was interviewed by CIO about how artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning can be used to outsource company weaknesses by assigning them to tasks humans are not as successful with.

Forbes

Holm on what keeps people wedded to AI

MSE’s Elizabeth Holm interviewed with Forbes about the changing culture surrounding how people use AI, explaining that four fundamental traits of the tech encourage usage.